Individual results may vary.


 

Chickenpox is caused by a virus varicella-zoster virus. It can spread to other people, thus the prevention is important.

The symptoms begin with red blister containing clear waters. It will begin to spread 1-2 days before the blister. The blister becomes flaky in 5-6 days after the first blister.

 

 


 Individual results may vary.

 

 

Good treatment

1. Prevent it from spreading to others, especially in children, pregnant women and people with low immunity. You should stop working until the water becomes scaly sore or about five days.

2. If there are blisters and you visit the doctor within 24-48 hours, take Acyclocir (4 g/d) 800 mg 5 times for 7 days in  adults. This will reduce the time of disease and violence. (Especially a lot of pain, facial and eyes blister. In infants, pregnant women, people with low immunity, patients with lung disease may found bleeding spots) http://www.britishinfection.org/drupal/sites/default/files/jeffery08VZV_0.pdf

3. Do not scratch, keep nails short. If you feel too itchy, take anti-inflammatory drug such as Hydroxyzine or Chlorphenamine but will be sleepy. Scratch is prohibited, it may lead to scarring.

4. In case of pain or fever, take painkillers such as Paracetamol (Tylenol).

5. Usually, most of the blister will slowly disappear without trace. But there are probably some traces such as hyperpigmentation, if there is an inflammation or scars which need treatment. Therefore, if you have the symptoms, see a doctor within 24 hours. Do not carve or scratch

 6. The wound treatment is cleaning the wound to prevent recurrent infection that cause inflammatory and apply moisturizer to heal the skin after bathing.

7. Drink plenty of water. Wear loose, comfortable shirt to prevent scratching.

8. People who have never had the symptoms can be prevented by vaccination namely chickenpox vaccine, especially in people who are close to people with low immunity and pregnant women must be prior injected at least three months.

 (zoster immune globulin (ZIG) is used in cases where the risk is serious such as pregnant women, infant or people with low immunity. 

http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm6228a4.htm)

Article By
Wutinan Sithipolvanichgul, MD

Specialized in Dermatologic Surgery and Laser
- Dermatologist, MSc UK
- Specialized in Dermatologic Surgery and Laser
- Member of American Society for Laser Medicine and Surgery
- Master class: Surgical Laser Procedures and Pigmented Laser in Amsterdam, the Netherlands
- Education in laser from such medical professional as Richard Rox Anderson M.D., who has been praised for his expertise in the global skin laser.